Thankful

November 30, 2014 at 2:09 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , )

In this season of gratitude I have extra reasons to be thankful.

Last week, I received some of the only good news about my systemic sarcoidosis I’ve gotten in the nearly eleven years since my diagnosis. My doctors wanted to see if they could measure the effects of Acthar—the injectable treatment that they used to try and replace Cytoxan about 6 months ago. I got a PET scan before I began Acthar. The results were demoralizing. “You lit up like a Christmas tree,” one of my doctors said, referring to the glowing orbs of inflammation that revealed the extent of the disease’s damage within me—in my lungs, my bones, my heart, my brain, even studding the skin beneath my arms and legs.

Last week, they repeated the PET scan. I waited with damp palms to go over the results with my local doctor. “I’m not going to use the word miraculous,” he said, “but these results are extraordinary.” The Acthar has made “significant” inroads against the sarcoidosis. Even my untrained eye could tell the difference between the two scans. While the first had glowed with the lurid presence of the disease’s globules everywhere, the second was darker, calmer, quieter. It feels like a double blessing. Not only did I get to stop Cytoxan, the most difficult of my monthly chemotherapies with the most side effects, but I was able to make some progress against sarcoidosis. I’m not well yet by any stretch of the imagination, but to be able to type that last sentence—to say I’ve made progress—is unfamiliar and exciting territory.

My double blessing is actually a triple one. If it weren’t for the generosity of a non-profit organization called the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD), I wouldn’t even have had the opportunity to test Acthar’s efficacy against my illness. Acthar costs somewhere between $30,000 and $60,000 a month. My health insurance plan refuses to cover the medication (and my positive PET scans won’t somehow force them to start. The plan will only accept the results of a large, peer-reviewed study as “acceptable” data that warrants providing coverage). If it weren’t for NORD, I would never have been able even to try Acthar. I’ve just renewed my application to NORD for next year. Hopefully, they will continue to help me.

I’m not accustomed to receiving good health news. I wasn’t quite sure how to react after reviewing the second PET scan. I’d grown unaccustomed to hope. Feeling it unfurling within me, like a green shoot taking root beneath the snow, leaves me breathless. The future feels a little more well-lit, a little wider. We’ll have to wait and see, of course, for what happens next. But for this moment, I can let just be grateful.

I’ll need to hang onto this awareness of gratitude in the coming weeks, which will be difficult. After this month’s round of chemo, Jay and I are heading to Ohio to meet with the sarcoidosis Guru to go over the results of the PET scans and try to figure out how to proceed and what to expect. I come home and immediately get knee surgery on December 9, to repair a torn ACL. Please keep me in your thoughts and prayers during this season of light and hope.

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Miraculous

May 20, 2014 at 9:01 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , )

It feels like a miracle has happened to me.

When I last wrote, I was stuck between good and bad news. The sarcoidosis guru I see in Ohio recommended a promising new treatment for me. But the plan managers for my prescription drug plan refused to cover the expensive medication called Acthar. Since then, we went through two rounds of appeals with the plan managers, and got a resounding “NO” for our efforts. In fact, the bureaucrats wouldn’t even talk to my doctor. A “licensed pharmacist” made the decision that I should try IV prednisone—as if I haven’t endured numerous rounds of that over the past decade.

We had one round of appeals left. Unfortunately, the plan managers told us that even if we somehow convinced them to approve Acthar, they could opt to classify it in their pricing scheme so that we would have to pay for half the medication – which wouldn’t even count toward our annual out-of-pocket maximum. At somewhere around $30,000 a vial, such a victory over the plan managers would be a pyrrhic one. There is no way we could afford one month of such “coverage.”

I think I stopped taking real breaths after Jay got off the phone with the plan folks and told me the news. For the first time in many years, my doctor had a treatment that he thought might actually help me. After 3 months of Acthar, I could at least (hopefully) get a break from Cytoxan, the chemotherapy infusion I get every month. It felt like just as I heard the first good news in quite a while, faceless and nameless bureaucrats were snatching it away.

Here’s where the miracle comes in. The sarcoidosis guru put me in touch with a non-profit called NORD– National Organization for Rare Diseases (https://www.rarediseases.org/). In addition to providing advocacy and education for those affected with rare diseases, including sarcoidosis, NORD offers patient assistance programs. One such program helps patients obtain so-called “orphan drugs”—medications that treat rare diseases and so are not manufactured in large quantities and are often extremely expensive—like Acthar. I filled out an application, crossed my fingers, and kept holding my breath.

I found out yesterday that NORD approved me for full assistance so that I can obtain a 9-months’ supply of Acthar at no cost. I am overwhelmed with gratitude to NORD and its donors who made this possible. I can’t put into words how grateful and we relieved we are. I finally took a real breath. We can postpone our battle royale with the plan manager. I can try out this new treatment, and maybe get a break from the awful side effects of the Cytoxan. It brings tears to my eyes every time I think about it. All I can say and feel is “thank you, thank you, thank you.”

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