Catch-22

May 1, 2015 at 5:06 pm (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , )

I’m sorry for not writing here for so long. It’s been a rough few months. Nothing cataclysmic happened—no time in the hospital or emergency trips to specialists—but it hasn’t been easy since I wrote those happy posts about starting Acthar and how much better I was feeling.

The Acthar has caught me in a Catch-22 bind. Wikipedia defines Catch-22 as “a paradoxical situation from which an individual cannot escape because of contradictory rules.” The paradox I’m confronting is this: at a high dose, Acthar does seem to control the worst of my neurosarcoidosis and keep me out of the hospital – it just causes severe depression in the process.

I’ve bumped into depression at varying degrees throughout my life. In the past, I’ve negotiated bad patches with patience, medication, and therapy, and arrived more or less unscathed on the other side of inner darkness. It feels different this time. Medication doesn’t seem to be helping drag me out of the bleakest areas of my internal landscape. I go to therapy and try to cultivate patience, but still, the depression sticks to me like humidity.

To try to address the depression, my doctors had me cut back on my Acthar dose, but within weeks subcutaneous sarcoidosis—little nodules that erupt beneath my skin that usually are harbingers of the disease’s resurgence—dotted my arms like shotgun pellets. Then along came more disruptive and dangerous symptoms. The headaches and vertigo caused by the sarcoidosis in my brain and cranial nerves came roaring back. I was stuck in bed for a couple of weeks. We promptly bumped my Acthar back up to its original dose. I feel this Catch-22 pressing like a barbed wire boundary no matter which way I turn. With less Acthar I am trapped in pain in bed, lonely and depressed. With more Acthar, I carry my loneliness and depression with me and don’t really want to get out of bed even if I’m feeling physically well enough to try.

Trying to put words to depression—to explain it or describe it—is like trying to catch fog. It emanates from dysfunctional neurotransmitters in the brain, and yet I feel its effects in my gut, my bones, and my soul. It’s a heaviness that pins me down the minute I awake. Writing, calling a friend, talking to Jay, smiling for Andrew, turning over in bed feel not just like too much work, but utterly impossible. It robs me of my life just as much as sarcoidosis. It leaches the color and the sound from life. I see Jay and Andrew moving through the house. They are talking, laughing, and mock arguing over the pronunciation of a word. But it’s like watching someone watch a silent, sepia-tinted movie on television. I can’t reach them. I can’t join them.

I think what’s making it especially hard to try and emerge from depression this time is that not only am I injecting myself twice weekly with the higher doses of Acthar, but I’m also attempting to manage being sick and depressed at the same time. This probably sounds logical to everyone outside my own heavy brain, but it finally dawned on me the other day how much chronic illness and depression feed on and reinforce each other. A sick day and a depressed day look and feel very much alike. They are empty days, spent in bed, with the blinds drawn. There is something wrong with my head, and it’s making the rest of me unable to join life. If I could stick to a schedule, I think it might help me fight the depression. Positive routines in the past have helped me blast myself out of the cocoon of inner darkness. But it’s nearly impossible to formulate and stick to a routine when I’m also trying to manage a chronic illness whose main characteristics are chronic pain and chronic fatigue – you never know how you might feel when you wake up in the morning, but the odds seem to be not good.

Wikipedia doesn’t tell you how to emerge from a Catch-22 trap. I’m certainly not stopping my Acthar. I’m not going to let the disease lay waste to my body. But I also can’t let the depression conquer my soul. What do I do? I think there’s something to my old standby of patience, medication, and therapy. Maybe my body will adjust to the Acthar, or maybe the anti-depressants will kick in more fully. Maybe I’ll find a way (and enough health) to hammer out and stick to a basic schedule that gets me out of the house and interacting with the world every day. Maybe if I stick to my new goal of trying desperately to put into words my fight against depression, I’ll find a way through the fog, back to the brilliant, colorful world I can sense is right in front of me

I know that’s a lot of maybes. But it’s what I’ve got.

3 Comments

  1. katemcivor said,

    Ah, Rebecca. What a terrible catch-22. I am busy-ish, but I’m in Helena until August. Anytime you feel up to doing anything (going out to lunch, taking a walk, talking on the phone), just call me or text me. I think you have my number: 461-8145. If I’m not working at the Sewing Palace, I will hop in my car and go to you. When you’ve got a chronic illness and chronic sadness, you can’t plan to do something next week or in a few days because you don’t know if you’ll feel good enough. When you feel like it, call me!

  2. Lori Tuck said,

    Rebecca it was wonderful to see you last nite and I really enjoyed listening to your piece. It was great to catch up and share stories about how our sons are doing. I am not sure what to say, I’ve been such an absent friend, but you, Jay, and Andrew have been in my thots and prayers.

  3. Nedra said,

    Dear Rebecca, I felt so glad to see you and hear you last night at Red Atlas! Thank you for sharing your stories and for sharing so much of yourself and your experience. Thanks R. And please keep writing, keep connecting. N

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